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Living Faith is a Christian blog that interacts with a variety of biblical, theological and practical topics written by Grand Canyon University's College of Theology faculty and specially invited guests of the college. Our content provides practical and biblical advice from a Christian worldview for living our faith in the midst of an increasingly secularized world. In addition, our content wrestles with cultural topics and issues that challenge how we live out our faith as believers. For this reason, contributors to our Christian blog strive to write with compassion and apologetic concern to honor Christ and edify the church in every way possible.
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Category: Theology Thursday
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By David Farbishel
Faculty, College of Theology 

The fall of humanity – sounds alarming, and so it should! Genesis 3 tells the story of how our first parents, knowing full well what they were doing, trusted in themselves (with help from Satan) and rebelled against God’s clear command. All other commands seemed reasonable to them – to tend the garden, to multiply, to rule over the earth. But this one to not eat of a particular tree was a command they had to obey simply out of love and respect for their Creator.

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By Matt Hampton
Faculty, College of Theology

In John 10:10, God’s words state that the thief comes to steal, kill and destroy. Christ says, I came that they might have life and have it abundantly (John 10:10). Do you feel like your life is full of peace, joy and abundance? If not, why is that the case? In the Old Testament, Moses spent many years wandering through the desert or what we would describe as the wilderness. It was hard and tedious and not exactly like he had pictured it. Is your life not like you pictured it at times? What is missing? What can you change to get out of your own wilderness?

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By Todd Forrest
Faculty, College of Theology

This past Tuesday, beyond the Halloween hype, a more noble celebration of the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation was celebrated around the world. The sound of Martin Luther’s hammer still rings out today as his message of the 95 theses, nailed on the door of Wittenberg Castle, challenged the way people worshipped and practiced their faith in God. One of the core beliefs elevated in the Reformation was Sola Scriptura, a Latin term meaning “by scripture alone.” Just like today, there were many voices that were telling people how to live and Luther’s call to the church was to get back to life by the Bible.

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By Brett Berger
Faculty, College of Theology

You hear a lot of talk about escaping these days. People talk about sports as an escape. Video games, movies, virtual reality, gambling, fantasy are all ways people escape from their everyday lives.

The idea is that everyday life is filled with a certain measure of stress, toil, conflict and futility. We look at the news or our social media feeds, and we find all kinds of distressing realities. Reality can be depressing. If not depressing, it certainly feels just ordinary. For the modern American, there is nothing worse than ordinary. It is not surprising, therefore, that so many of us are looking for escape. If only for brief moments, people want to withdraw from the everyday. They want something unreal, even hyper-real.

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By Chip Lamca
Faculty, College of Theology

“Thus the heavens and the earth were finished, and all the host of them. … So God blessed the seventh day and made it holy, because on it God rested from all his work that he had done in creation.” (Genesis 2:1, 3)

In the spirit of full disclosure, this is being written late on a Friday afternoon near the middle of a semester. I hope I will be excused if the theme of rest is just a little self-serving, but I will not apologize for thinking on this biblical principle. What can we learn about rest?

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By Steve Sherman, PhD
Faculty, College of Theology

A recent headline in a national newspaper read, “NYT could try a little humility . . .” It made me wonder whether replacing “NYT” with “Christians” might be appropriate as it concerns our attitudes and interpretations . . . at least now and then. What could be a way forward in both loving the truth and humbly doing so?

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By Daniel Diffey, PhD
Assistant Dean, Grand Canyon Theological Seminary

When we read any part of the Bible it is important to know where the section we are reading fits within the biblical storyline. It is similarly important to know if what we are reading is discussed anywhere else in Scripture. When we read about creation there are a lot of things that we could talk about, but I want to focus on one thing that is crucial to understand that concerns both the storyline of the Bible and a theme that is found the beginning and end of Scripture. The creation narrative in Genesis 1-2 is bookended by the new creation narrative in Revelation 21-22.

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By Joshua Greever
Faculty, College of Theology

“Heaven is my throne, and the earth is my footstool; what is the house that you would build for me, and what is the place of my rest? All these things my hand has made, and so all these things came to be.” (Isaiah 66:1-2)

In the ancient world, temples were built to serve as a kind of “house” in which the deity would dwell and in which sacrifices to the deity would be offered. Indeed, even in Israel, King Solomon built a temple that would serve as the sign of God’s presence among his people and be the place where sacrifices were offered.

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By Todd Forrest
Faculty, College of Theology

There are few things more enjoyable than a good Reese’s cup. The chocolate and peanut butter just make sense. Many things in our world just seem to fit together and make sense.

This seems to be, in a larger sense, the drive of mankind. How do I make sense out of this world? God planned for our world to make sense out of relationships. These relationships are both vertical (with God and man) and horizontal (with each other). This brings the richness of life that makes sense of the world. The simple words of Jesus, summing up all the commands: “Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind. This is the first and greatest commandment. And the second is like it: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’” (Matthew 22:37-39)

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By Sammy Alfaro
Faculty, College of Theology 

The book of Job begins with a brief description of the man who will be the central character of the narrative. “There was a man in the land of Uz whose name was Job, and that man was blameless and upright, one who feared God and turned away from evil” (Job 1:1). From this short blurb on Job’s life, we learn a great deal about how he will respond when facing disaster. These italicized words are a window into Job’s worldview for through them we come to understand his basic mode of operation even when tested by suffering. Likewise, a tagline description of our own worldview should provide a quick sketch of how we might respond in the middle of the storm.

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By Anna Faith Smith
Associate Dean, College of Theology

Worldview is a strange topic in some ways. Human beings all have a worldview, but most often it is acquired and exercised with no intention or attention. Children are brought up under whatever circumstances their parents choose. They live where their parents choose. They go to the church their parents choose or do not go to church at all if that is their parent’s choice. They hear the political rhetoric their parents embrace. They have the number of siblings that are born into their family without their input. They learn from neighbors and teachers whom they did not choose. Despite these decisions that are made without their approval, the children’s worldview is being formed in that setting.

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By Jason Hiles
Dean, College of Theology 

I am pleased to announce the return of a popular series that has been on hiatus over the summer. Theology Thursday is back! Written by the dean and faculty of the College of Theology, this series is dedicated to faith and the Christian life. This year the series will focus on various aspects of the Christian worldview in order to provide insight into the ways Christians should think and live as they strive to follow Jesus day by day.

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