About
Living Faith is a Christian blog that interacts with a variety of biblical, theological and practical topics written by Grand Canyon University's College of Theology faculty and specially invited guests of the college. Our content provides practical and biblical advice from a Christian worldview for living our faith in the midst of an increasingly secularized world. In addition, our content wrestles with cultural topics and issues that challenge how we live out our faith as believers. For this reason, contributors to our Christian blog strive to write with compassion and apologetic concern to honor Christ and edify the church in every way possible.
Let's get started on your degree

* Do you have a high school, college or university credits from outside the U.S.?
* Are you a U.S. Citizen?
* Are you a licensed, registered nurse in the U.S.?
(example: 777-777-7777)
Browse

* Required field

** Required field if international

Request More Information
Category: Theology Thursday
0

By Justin McLendon
Faculty, College of Theology

Over the years, I have accepted the reality I certainly will face when reading through any one of the great Christian classics again. Whether it is J. I. Packer’s “Knowing God,” John Bunyan’s “Pilgrim’s Progress,” or perhaps less familiar, that time where the boy Shasta, in his perilous emptiness, meets Aslan in C. S. Lewis’ “The Horse and His Boy.” I am accustomed to the places where my emotions will overwhelm me when I read these works. It is as if the crinkled pages of these worn copies serve as reminders of the tears, which I could not hold back in past readings.

Continue Reading
0

By Todd Forrest
Faculty, College of Theology

 “If I could just change…”

No matter how you fill in that blank, we all see things in our personal lives that need attention. Some changes may be physical, in personality, in how we respond with our emotions or in our spiritual lives. In Galatians 2:20, Paul states, “I have been crucified with Christ and I no longer live, but Christ lives in me. The life I now live in the body, I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me.”

Pondering the result as stated in “the life I now live” resonates with transformation. As I live out a relationship with Jesus, I live differently. Now, this is not in a weird way, but trust in an identity beyond me. “The life I now live” is different. I have a comfort in my fear and anxiety. I have strength in my times of weakness. I have a sense of meaning and purpose in this world. I have joy in my life’s journey that no one or nothing can take from me.

Continue Reading
0

By Joshua Greever
Faculty, College of Theology

In his famous Sermon on the Mount, Jesus contrasted what he called treasures on earth and treasures in heaven. Treasures on earth are evanescent and corruptible, whereas treasures in heaven will never pass away or suffer corrosion. What one treasures matters, because “where your treasure is, there your heart will be also” (Matthew 6:21).

Continue Reading
0

Todd Forrest
Faculty, College of Theology

When we think of what the stereotypical Christian should look like, we probably all can think of what that should be. Maybe when we ponder this, we end up focusing more on what that person should NOT be.

A follower of Christ is not merely a good person; we are to be like Jesus. Now, a quick reflection of our lives reveals that there is no one JUST like Jesus. However, there is an intentional life trajectory toward character transformation, starting with the decision of the mind, the commitment of heart and revealing its resolve in the motivations and actions in life.

Continue Reading
0

By Peter Anderson
Professor, College of Theology

We live in an unprecedented age of immediacy. Do you need to know the best Mediterranean restaurant within walking distance? No problem. Just ask Siri or Google. Do you want to visit with family or friends across the country or around the world? Sounds great. Just pull up FaceTime or Skype. Are you curious about what’s happening in Beckley, West Virginia today? Even if you have no clue where my hometown is and have absolutely no connection to that place, you could still find out all the local news in a few clicks of a trackpad or taps on your screen.

Continue Reading
0

By Manny Cota
Faculty, College of Theology

The biblical commands to deny one’s self can be some of the most puzzling to understand and difficult to live out. Yet obedience to these commands is essential to the work of sanctification, which is empowered by the Holy Spirit. In addition, surrendering one’s life to these commands breeds genuine satisfaction and joy in life.

I Corinthians 10:24 says: “Let no one seek his own good, but the good of his neighbor.”

Continue Reading
0

By Ryan A. Brandt
Faculty, College of Theology

“And we all, with unveiled face, beholding the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into the same image from one degree of glory to another. For this comes from the Lord who is the Spirit” (2 Corinthians 3:18)

“This vision is beatific. It beatifies. It transforms the soul into the divine image; transfusing into it the divine life, so that it is filled with the fullness of God” (Charles Hodge, Systematic Theology, 3:860)

Continue Reading
0

By Justin McLendon
Faculty, College of Theology

Pastors and ministry leaders often struggle over diversity issues in their churches. Books, seminars, conferences and popular podcasts compel us to think through the deep implications of diversity for the health and vibrancy of the local church. From my perspective, while these conversations are necessary and helpful, they are often too one-sided when addressing the diversity we all desire in our churches.

Continue Reading
0

By Brett Berger
Faculty, College of Theology

It is possible that some will read the following as anti-science or anti-technology and that I am advocating for a fideist rejection of the world. I am not. I am writing a reflection on the foundation for hope.

I believe it is safe to assume that most people look out at the world around us and think, “You know, there is a lot that is not as it ought to be.” Whether that be our political situation, matters of health and disease, our food chain, poverty, racial strife, sexual mores, mental health, gun violence or any number of the points of pain we experience in this world, the present problems of the world drive us to look into the future for a better day and a better world.

Continue Reading
Next Page »

In case you missed it: