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Living Faith is a Christian blog that interacts with a variety of biblical, theological and practical topics written by Grand Canyon University's College of Theology faculty and specially invited guests of the college. Our content provides practical and biblical advice from a Christian worldview for living our faith in the midst of an increasingly secularized world. In addition, our content wrestles with cultural topics and issues that challenge how we live out our faith as believers. For this reason, contributors to our Christian blog strive to write with compassion and apologetic concern to honor Christ and edify the church in every way possible.
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Category: Theology Thursday
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By Steve Sherman
Faculty, College of Theology

My academic writing project on “The Knowledge of God” made me realize both what a HUGE topic this was and why, as a Christian I needed to dive deeply into the Scriptures for grounding and meaning of a truly biblical perspective. After months of research (and 85 written pages later!), I set out to summary the findings, which are presented here for your consideration—and in hopes of encouraging you to “know God”—in the ways the Bible itself describes.

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By Justin McLendon
Faculty, College of Theology

Our Christmas celebrations often focus upon the drama of the Christmas story. We listen in carefully as we imagine Joseph and Mary and their pursuit of a suitable place for delivery. We are awestruck by their fears and faith. We marvel at the shepherds, minding their own business in a nameless field, whom the Lord reveals a plan far greater than tending sheep. Our curiosity stirs as we inquire about the wise men and their placement in the chronological events of our Lord’s birth. And we equally imagine what it was like to witness our Lord’s birth in a lowly manger. Yet, if we are not careful, we’ll become absorbed in the drama and miss a crucial aspect of the story’s main character.

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By Joshua Greever
Faculty, College of Theology

Happy New Year! Around this time of year, many across the globe make New Year’s “resolutions.” They hope that somehow their own personal past of broken resolutions isn’t a prelude to more broken resolutions in the future. They hope that in some way these resolutions will bring them to live a better lifestyle and enjoy a more fulfilling existence. Whatever resolutions you may have set out to accomplish this year, I want to encourage you in 2018 and beyond to resolve to rest in Jesus.

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By Brett Berger
Faculty, College of Theology

During this season, it seems we cannot help but be more tuned-in to time. The term “Holiday Season” itself forces us to think in terms of time. As we approach Christmas, the pace of time seems to increase as we scurry about in our preparations and celebrations. We may think there is not enough time. As we move past Christmas and come to New Years, we think about the last year, we naturally assess where our lives are and where they are going. Perhaps, we lament another year has escaped us.

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By Anna Faith Smith
Associate Dean, College of Theology 

Having spent the last six weeks of Theology Thursday considering the fall of humanity and the consequences of sin, we can clearly see that we need hope and that we are incapable of providing that hope for ourselves. What should come as no surprise to us is that God knew we would sin. In addition to that, he knew that we would be incapable of restoring our relationship with him after we had sinned.

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By Jason Hiles
Dean, College of Theology

Throughout my “glory days” in high school, I played on the football team. During the course of one game, I was hit so hard that I recall standing up to find that the field around me was shaking. Of course, the field wasn’t actually shaking. My perception had been altered by a brutal hit to the head that left me with the impression that I was experiencing something like an earthquake. Since no one else seemed to notice the “earthquake,” after a few seconds I realized that the problem was in my head rather than on the field. Imagine how my experience would have differed if I had been born into a world that seemed to shake and quake from day one because of an issue in my mind. And imagine if everyone else around me experienced the world in the same shaky way. When our experience is off for a few moments we can generally determine that our perception is the problem, but making that determination is much more challenging when our perception is perpetually out of whack.

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By Scott Hovater
Faculty, College of Theology

Life can seem scary and frightening at times. The daily news is full of stories of innocent people being killed or seriously hurt by natural disasters, disease, mass shootings, drunk drivers or just simple accidents. It seems like no matter what we do, we might just end up in the wrong place at the wrong time. What are we to do? Should we hide away from the world trying to avoid all possible scenarios that might cause us harm? Certainly most would agree that hiding away from the world is not really an option. Besides, who’s to say tragedy cannot befall us even while we are trying to avoid it. We live in a fallen world were bad things can happen to any one of us at any time.

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By David Farbishel
Faculty, College of Theology 

The fall of humanity – sounds alarming, and so it should! Genesis 3 tells the story of how our first parents, knowing full well what they were doing, trusted in themselves (with help from Satan) and rebelled against God’s clear command. All other commands seemed reasonable to them – to tend the garden, to multiply, to rule over the earth. But this one to not eat of a particular tree was a command they had to obey simply out of love and respect for their Creator.

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By Matt Hampton
Faculty, College of Theology

In John 10:10, God’s words state that the thief comes to steal, kill and destroy. Christ says, I came that they might have life and have it abundantly (John 10:10). Do you feel like your life is full of peace, joy and abundance? If not, why is that the case? In the Old Testament, Moses spent many years wandering through the desert or what we would describe as the wilderness. It was hard and tedious and not exactly like he had pictured it. Is your life not like you pictured it at times? What is missing? What can you change to get out of your own wilderness?

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By Todd Forrest
Faculty, College of Theology

This past Tuesday, beyond the Halloween hype, a more noble celebration of the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation was celebrated around the world. The sound of Martin Luther’s hammer still rings out today as his message of the 95 theses, nailed on the door of Wittenberg Castle, challenged the way people worshipped and practiced their faith in God. One of the core beliefs elevated in the Reformation was Sola Scriptura, a Latin term meaning “by scripture alone.” Just like today, there were many voices that were telling people how to live and Luther’s call to the church was to get back to life by the Bible.

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By Brett Berger
Faculty, College of Theology

You hear a lot of talk about escaping these days. People talk about sports as an escape. Video games, movies, virtual reality, gambling, fantasy are all ways people escape from their everyday lives.

The idea is that everyday life is filled with a certain measure of stress, toil, conflict and futility. We look at the news or our social media feeds, and we find all kinds of distressing realities. Reality can be depressing. If not depressing, it certainly feels just ordinary. For the modern American, there is nothing worse than ordinary. It is not surprising, therefore, that so many of us are looking for escape. If only for brief moments, people want to withdraw from the everyday. They want something unreal, even hyper-real.

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