About
Living Faith is a Christian blog that interacts with a variety of biblical, theological and practical topics written by Grand Canyon University's College of Theology faculty and specially invited guests of the college. Our content provides practical and biblical advice from a Christian worldview for living our faith in the midst of an increasingly secularized world. In addition, our content wrestles with cultural topics and issues that challenge how we live out our faith as believers. For this reason, contributors to our Christian blog strive to write with compassion and apologetic concern to honor Christ and edify the church in every way possible.
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Category: Faith and Living
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By Rob Krise
Faculty, College of Theology

Every Christian, even me, has both a vision of specific tasks God has for them throughout their lives and foundational tasks that are basic to the faith. When Jesus met with His disciples after He rose from the dead, He told them that they were to make disciples. Called the Great Commission, the twenty-eighth chapter of Matthew contains the charge for Christians to make disciples, and this starts with introducing others to Christ. The primary responsibility for the Christian is to be able to explain to others how to have a relationship in Christ. People need to hear the Good News.

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By Shelly Hogan
Faculty, College of Theology

From the start of the human race, it has been evident that authentic and meaningful relationships are essential. In fact, one of the first recorded words from God on the subject, “It is not good that the man should be alone,” reminds us that life is best lived with others and meaningful connections make our lives richer (Genesis 2:18). However, building and keeping significant connection isn’t always easy. Deep connection takes effort so let me offer three important relationship reminders: be available, be authentic and be attentive.

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By Scott Hovater
Faculty, College of Theology

“God loves a cheerful giver” – 2 Colossians 9:7

If you have been a Christian for any length of time you are familiar with this verse. We hear it from our pastor when giving dips too low. We hear it when there is a new church building project in the works. We hear it when a missionary comes to share about their ministry. We hear it on Christian radio and television when we are asked to support so many worthy causes. As the offering plate is passed and we grudgingly pull out our wallet, we even hear a sweet, internal voice in our head saying, “Now remember, God loves a cheerful giver!”

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By Andrew Mooney
Faculty, College of Theology

This author’s philosophy of seeking and becoming a mentor derives from three basic modalities: First, intentionally embracing all people, no matter what race, status or faith background. Second, offering encouragement, in some way, to everyone that crosses the one’s path. Finally, equipping individuals with the tools (intrinsic or extrinsic) that will develop/reinforce pride in self, which strengthens confidence. A mentor is a person that seeks to invest in another, sharing from his or her experience, skill set or knowledge.

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By Mark R. Kreitzer, PhD
Faculty, College of Theology

Spiritual formation can be described as growth from spiritual infancy to mentorship. The Apostle John sets out three stages of spiritual growth in 1 John 2. He indicates that a person enters the first stage of growth when he or she becomes a baby Christian by trusting in the Father through Christ (1 John 2:12-14). As a Christian grows, he or she eventually becomes a young warrior (vs 13b, 14b). After learning spiritual warfare in this stage, a person progresses to become a seasoned warrior and later a father-mentor in the faith (13a, 14a).

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By Andy McClurg
Faculty, College of Theology

Does your love for God sometimes seem like it is like a feeble flame, ready to be blown out by the next strong wind? Do the spiritual disciplines seem at times to be drudgery? Does it sometimes seem as if your prayers are getting no higher than the ceiling? There are at least four steps that we can use to deal with such seasons of spiritual dryness.

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By Valerie Del a Torre
Faculty, College of Theology

Once upon a time, not long ago on Sunday, churches were full, stores, gas stations and even saloons were closed and families spent a day together. Well, fast forward to our day and Sunday is a fully scheduled day to get everything in that we missed over the week or the day for the cabin, the lake and the ball game. What about the church?

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By Daniel Diffey
Faculty, College of Theology

Why do you read the Bible? Or maybe I should ask the question, why do you not read the Bible? As someone who teaches the Bible in both the context of the university and the church, it is clear that many Christians do not take reading their Bibles seriously. In this blog post, I want to briefly discuss a few reasons why you should be engaged in the spiritual discipline of Bible reading on a regular basis, how you can build the habit of regular Bible reading into your life and some ways to approach the Bible

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Dr. Mark Kreitzer is the World Missions professor for the College of Theology. Over the course of his experience with Grand Canyon University, he and his wife have been powerful pillars of prayer. They have begun prayer initiatives for the campus, led First Friday prayer sessions and maintained an active devotion to praying for the faculty members and students within the College of Theology.

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