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The College of Science, Engineering and Technology offers degree programs that prepare students for high-demand professions in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields. With an emphasis on Grand Canyon University’s Christian worldview, our college believes in instilling social awareness, responsibility, ethical character and compassion. Our blog, BrainSTEM, focuses on topics related to science, engineering and technology, with engaging contributions from students, staff and faculty. On the blog, you can find helpful resources relating to STEM fields and learn more about current events occurring globally, locally and within GCU. We hope to provide our readers with information that helps them learn about the necessary knowledge, skills and mental disciplines to succeed in today’s job market.
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Category: Medical Studies and Exercise Science
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The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that employment for physician assistants (PAs) will grow by 37 percent between 2016 and 2026, which is much faster than the average for all professions. For learners who plan to pursue a career as a PA, the Bachelor of Science in Biology With an Emphasis in Pre-Physician Assistant degree program from Grand Canyon University can provide an ideal educational platform.

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By Kaylor Jones
Professional Writing and Psychology, Honors College

The human body is an amazing machine, all of its cogs working together smoothly to optimize daily functioning. While earning a BS in Biology with an Emphasis in Pre-Medicine or a BS in Nutritional Sciences through the College of Science, Engineering and Technology, students at Grand Canyon University will study anatomy and physiology to learn the roles of the systems of the body. Some of these body parts, however, appear to have no important role to the modern human.

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By Suzanne Currey
Biology Major, College of Science, Engineering and Technology

Content warning: detailed descriptions of cadavers are included in this blog.

Grand Canyon University offers a multitude of grand opportunities for both students and prospective students. One example in particular has to do with the fact that GCU is one of the few undergraduate colleges that allow students to get hands-on experience with cadavers.

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By Andrea Strock, MNS
Instructor, College of Science, Engineering and Technology

As a physics instructor I am frequently asked questions like, “When are we ever going to use this in real life?” Often, this question comes from students majoring in fields that are not considered “techy” such as biology and pre-medicine. Physics lends itself naturally to degrees in engineering and mathematics, so it is usually easy for students in those majors to understand why they are enrolled in a physics class, but more often than not, pre-health professional biology majors (pre-medical professional, pre-physical therapy, pre-physician assistant, etc.) are left scratching their heads and wondering how physics is applicable to them.

In the midst of a rigorous physics curriculum such as the one offered at Grand Canyon University, pre-health professional biology students have an especially difficult time understanding why they are in the class and how it is relevant for them and their future goals. Rest assured, pre-health professional biology majors– you are not wasting your time by learning basic physics!

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By Neal Adam, PhD
Faculty, College of Science, Engineering and Technology

I would like to take this opportunity to introduce one of my students. Rachel Kawakami was a student in my BIO-182 (Intro Biology) and BIO-365 (Biostatistics) classes. She is from Ka’a’awa, Oahu, and is a senior here at GCU, majoring in biology with an emphasis in pre-medicine. She had the opportunity to participate in a summer research internship.  This is what Rachel has to say about her 2017 summer research internship:

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By Myles Williams and Cassandra Jones
Pre-Physical Therapy Majors, College of Science, Engineering and Technology

Have you ever seen people walking around with red circles on their back, legs or arms? How about Michael Phelps in the Olympics with strange marks on his back? Well, we finally figured out what the conversation was really about. On September 23, a group of students from Grand Canyon University AzHOSA and the GCU Physical Therapy Club got to partake in a cupping clinic and live demonstration. The cupping clinic featured the expertise of Kelly Zink, an athletic trainer from Foothills Sports Medicine Physical Therapy in Peoria, Arizona.

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By Audrey French
Dual Enrollment Student

Vivid descriptions of a cadaver are included in this article. Consider yourself forewarned.

I cannot believe I am doing this.

I stood outside the Grand Canyon University cadaver lab, overwhelmed by nerves. Why in the world did I sign up for a field trip where we would be viewing the anatomy of a complete (very dead) body? Whatever happened to peaceful field trips to the zoo and aquarium?

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By Darien Hall, PhD
Faculty, College of Science, Engineering and Technology

It has already been a productive school year for the Canyon Neuroscience Center (CNC), and it looks like it’s only bound to get busier. With multiple ongoing projects established by faculty within the College of Science, Engineering and Technology, the CNC is one of several Research and Design Programs that give students the opportunity to perform hands-on research. Established in the fall of 2016, the CNC has multiple research foci; Drs. Cynthia Foote, Sherlin Moses and I are investigating the neurobiological mechanisms underlying Alzheimer’s disease using a cell culture model; Dr. Anju Dubey has created an app that tracks heart rate variability; and our newest faculty member, Dr. Randy Boyles, is exploring the role of chromatin remodeling in neurodegenerative diseases using fruit flies.

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By Michael Bodeen, MHPE
Faculty, College of Science, Engineering and Technology

Becoming a healthcare provider can be very challenging, with academic demands exceeding many other programs. To be competitive for consideration to a medical or dental graduate school requires internal drive, focus, academic success, good entrance exam test scores, experience, a bit of good luck – and one might think a touch of divine intervention.

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