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The College of Science, Engineering and Technology offers degree programs that prepare students for high-demand professions in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields. With an emphasis on Grand Canyon University’s Christian worldview, our college believes in instilling social awareness, responsibility, ethical character and compassion. Our blog, BrainSTEM, focuses on topics related to science, engineering and technology, with engaging contributions from students, staff and faculty. On the blog, you can find helpful resources relating to STEM fields and learn more about current events occurring globally, locally and within GCU. We hope to provide our readers with information that helps them learn about the necessary knowledge, skills and mental disciplines to succeed in today’s job market.
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Category: College of Science, Engineering and Technology
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As a science major, you are likely to enroll in a course on anatomy and physiology. An introductory anatomy course will cover a great deal of material pertaining to the cells and tissues and bodily systems. Students will learn to recognize key concepts in organ systems and body function. It can be challenging to retain all of this information. There are a few smart studying strategies you can use to give your brain a boost.

Use Anatomy Mnemonic Devices

Mnemonic devices are memory tricks that can help your brain remember complex information. There are at least nine basic types of mnemonics, including musical jingles (ever wonder why so many TV commercials are set to music?) and expression mnemonics. Expression mnemonics are the most commonly used. You might remember Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally from your high school math classes. It helps students remember the order of operations, from parentheses to subtraction. One helpful device for anatomy is PEST OF, which can help you remember the cranial bones:

  • Parietal
  • Ethmoid
  • Sphenoid
  • Temporal
  • Occipital
  • Frontal

Use the device, Come, Let’s Get Sun Burned, to remember the layers of the epidermis.

  • Corneum
  • Lucidum
  • Granulosum
  • Spinosum
  • Basale

Use Visualization Techniques

If you have an active imagination, you can create visual imprints in your mind for the concepts that you’re struggling with. Do this by considering words that might sound similar to the medical terminology. Then, form a picture of those words in your head. The sillier the picture is, the easier it will be to remember. For example, the ginglymoid  joints, which are the hinge joints, sound similar to “jingle mud.” Picture a golfer using those impressive elbow joints to swing a string of jingle bells back and forth through a patch of mud.

Learn the Latin and Greek Roots

If medical terminology sounds like a foreign language, it’s because much of it is! A lot of terms you’ll encounter in anatomy class have Latin or Greek roots. Learn the common prefixes, which are the groups of letters at the beginning of the word and suffixes, which are the letter groupings at the end. The root word is the base. As an example, take a look at “pericarditis.” The root is card, which means “heart.” The suffix is itis, which means “inflammation.” And the prefix is peri, which means “around.” Even if you’d never seen this word before, you could safely assume, based on its basic components, that pericarditis refers to inflammation around the heart. And if you’re familiar with the pericardium, which is the sac-like tissue that surrounds the heart, you can infer that pericarditis is specifically referring to the inflammation of the pericardium. Knowing the components of the words you’re studying can help you decipher other terms as well.

Anatomy is one of the courses you’ll take while you work to earn your Bachelor of Science in Forensic Science . This rigorous degree program will enable you to pursue a rewarding career as a forensic analysis professional. Click on the Request More Information button at the top of your screen to learn how you can become a student at Grand Canyon University.

 

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People sometimes assume that IT is always related to working at helpdesks and fixing computers. While the helpdesk is a possible career destination for IT students, it is not the only path associated with information technology. Grand Canyon University offers multiple bachelor’s degrees in different facets of IT to allow students to make informed decisions when attempting to navigate their areas of interest.

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By Kaylor Jones
Professional Writing & Psychology, College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Grand Canyon University’s College of Science, Engineering and Technology offers a variety of STEM degrees for working professionals and students transferring with an associate degree or other college credits. With the STEM field growing faster than ever before, read more about all the reasons why you should complete an online STEM degree.

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Spending too much time in front of a computer screen can be a common problem for many people. However, this can be even more of an issue when you’re pursuing a career in video gaming and simulation design. To help stay healthy while completing GCU’s Bachelor of Science in Computer Science with an Emphasis in Game and Simulation Development, use the following tips:

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By Emmett Rogers
Student, College of Science, Engineering and Technology

During my time in the BS in Biology with an Emphasis in Pre-Medicine program at GCU, I wanted to be as involved as I possibly could while still being able to focus on my studies. However, I did not join any clubs throughout college, preferring to get involved with a research group instead. I wanted to have research experience because it helps with self-learning and forces you to think further into a specific topic.

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By Kaylor Jones
Professional Writing and Psychology, Honors College

This summer, Dr. Ramesh Velupillaimani traveled to Uppsala, Sweden to present his research findings on photosynthesis at the First European Congress on Photosynthesis Research, ePS-1 A Marcus Wallenberg Symposium in Sweden.

Dr. Velupillaimani has been studying how green algae (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) captures and converts solar energy into chemical energy by using an ultrafast spectroscopic approach. The goal of this research is to produce fuel directly from the sun’s energy, using natural or artificial photosynthesis. This is a potential method to help meet the world’s growing energy needs.

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By Kaylor Jones
Professional Writing and Psychology, Honors College

The College of Science, Engineering and Technology recently sent four teams to Opportunity Hack 2018, a two-day coding event where the GCU Big Data and IT/Cyber team placed second out of 27 teams, winning a combined $5,000 prize. The team, made up of students Tom Fowler, Joshua Lee, Thomas Gleason and Christian Taillon, presented their solution to a pressing problem from local nonprofits.

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Hackers have become a lot more sophisticated since the era of dumpster diving. If you decide to become a cybersecurity specialist, you’ll need to stay up to date on the latest technologies and techniques that criminals are using to compromise sensitive data. Many aspiring information technology professionals choose to enroll in Grand Canyon University because of our emphasis on hands-on projects and ethical decision-making in STEM fields.

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