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The College of Nursing and Health Care Professions is comprised of diverse health care disciplines, including nursing, health care administration, athletic training, public health and health care informatics. We are united by the common goal of training the next generation of health care professionals and leaders to effectively address health care challenges. The content of this blog includes perspectives on current health care topics, discussion about health care trends, a showcase of successful alumni and faculty and posts about our passion for our respective fields.
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5 Unique Nursing Jobs for BSN-Prepared Nurses

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Doctors without borders listen to a child's heartbeat

For most people, the career path of those who earn a BSN degree seems pretty straightforward. Hospitals and doctors’ offices are common settings in which nurses work; however, those who earn their BSN degree are not limited to work in only these settings.

Today, there are many unique nursing jobs that go beyond working in traditional settings. Here is a list of just several of the many unique job opportunities in the field of nursing.

Camp Nurse

This type of nurse commonly works in children’s summer camps. Their responsibilities include providing routine and emergency care to children and camp staff, monitoring children with chronic diseases and educating campers and staff about preventative health issues. In addition, they collaborate with camp administrators to implement policies that reduce the risk of injury or illness at the camp in which they work (Broussard, 2007). Their overall goal is to ensure everyone at the camp remains healthy throughout their stay.

International Nurse

A BSN degree earned in the U.S. can be applied to many other countries. International nurses are passionate about helping those in need, as they travel the world and take care of patients in other countries or aid underserved nations. Nurses with a desire to travel can use their skills in different areas of the world, and they can immerse in different cultures. As a result, they are exposed to different types of medical treatments and procedures and learn to communicate with all kinds of patients (“International Nurse,” n.d.).

Nurse Coach

While all nurses promote healthy choices among their patients, helping patients adopt healthy lifestyles is the main focus of nursing coaches. Insurance companies and incorporations employ nurse coaches to educate employees about healthy living, which minimizes financial burdens that occur when employees of an organization are unhealthy. Nurse coaches commonly work with individuals with chronic health issues such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and they teach them how to manage their illness and make healthy choices (Bratiano, n.d.).

Missionary Nurse

Missionary nurses meet both physical and spiritual needs of patients in countries with poor healthcare provision. In treating injuries and illnesses, they also share their faith. They often work for an organization and are involved in promoting projects in foreign countries such as digging clean water wells and building schools. They learn to perform the duties of traditional nurses, but often with very limited resources. In addition to having their BSN, missionary nurses often go through religious or seminary training (“Missionary Nurse,” n.d.).

Pharmaceutical Nurse

A career as a pharmaceutical nurse provides a different way for nurses to apply their knowledge and experience in the field of healthcare. The pharmaceutical industry develops, tests, produces and markets drugs licensed for use as medications. Therefore, nurses who work in this field can work in sales or be involved in pharmaceutical research. In pharmaceutical sales, nurses meet with pharmacists and physicians to tell them about new drugs on the market and different ways to use existing drugs. Nurses who work in pharmaceutical research are involved in clinical trials, and monitor human subjects used in the testing of drugs by recording vital signs, reviewing lab values, documenting the trial process and interviewing patients (Kontakos, 2012).

Grand Canyon University’s College of Nursing and Health Care Professions prepares graduates to provide quality care centered on meeting the unique needs of the populations they serve. To learn more about GCU’s nursing programs, visit our website or contact us using the Request More Information button at the top of the page.

Written by Lauren Abraham, a senior majoring in communications at GCU.

References:

  • 100 Best Things to do with a Nursing Degree. (n.d.) Retrieved from here nursejournal.org/articles/100-things-you-can-do-with-a-nursing-degree
  • Bratiano, P. (n.d.). Nurse/Health Coach Careers with BSN. Retrieved from practicalnursing.org/nurse-health-coach-careers-bsn
  • Broussard, L. (2007). Camp Nursing: Rewards and Challenges. Retrieved from medscape.com/viewarticle/560630_4
  • International Nurse. (n.d.). Retrieved from discovernursing.com/specialty/international-nurse#.Vr0Lj_krKCg
  • Kontakos, P. (2012). Nurses Working Pharmaceutical Jobs. Retrieved from business2community.com/trends-news/nurses-working-pharmaceutical-jobs
  • Missionary Nursing and Salary and Career Outlook. (n.d.). Retrieved from nursejournal.org/travel-nursing/missionary-nurse-career-outlook