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The College of Nursing and Health Care Professions is comprised of diverse health care disciplines, including nursing, health care administration, athletic training, public health and health care informatics. We are united by the common goal of training the next generation of health care professionals and leaders to effectively address health care challenges. The content of this blog includes perspectives on current health care topics, discussion about health care trends, a showcase of successful alumni and faculty and posts about our passion for our respective fields.
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Category: RN to BSN
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In 1993, the American Nurses’ Credentialing Center (ANCC) began awarding Magnet status to hospitals that satisfied a set of criteria that measured the strength and quality of their nursing. A Magnet hospital delivers excellent patient outcomes, with a high level of job satisfaction for nurses, a low nursing staff turnover rate and appropriate grievance resolution. One of the criteria of the Magnet status is that nurse leaders must have at least a Bachelor of Science in Nursing – and many of these hospitals specifically seek BSN-prepared nurses to staff a majority of their nursing positions in an effort to deliver better patient outcomes.

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We live in a world where a strong education is key and new cutting-edge technology is a constant in the medical world. While registered nurses provide excellent care to all of their patients, the Institute of Medicine is recommending that 80% of nurses earn their Bachelor of Science in Nursing by 2020. However, according to the American Nurses Association, only 45% to 50% of nurses currently hold this credential.

Why should nurses earn their BSN? Why are hospitals and other healthcare organizations seeking BSN-prepared nurses? One reason is that studies show that BSN-prepared nurses have lower rates of patient mortality.

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For registered nurses who are interested in earning a Master of Science in Nursing, but don’t have their BSN, GCU offers a bridge program that helps students fast track to their master’s degree. An MSN bridge program is designed for students with a bachelor’s degree in a health-related area. By taking only 18 credits of bridge coursework, you could be on your way to earning your MSN:

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Going back to school is a big step for any student, especially for registered nurses who are choosing to further their education and career by earning their RN to BSN degree. These working professionals need to be fully in the know about their program so that they can accommodate their life at home and work to their new school schedule.

Grand Canyon University believes in always being transparent to students and works to earn our students’ trust by putting the student first. At GCU we honor your academic and professional goals and work alongside you to achieve them. Here are a few resources that GCU has designed for potential and current students to create a safe, trustworthy environment. These tools make it easy to enroll in our RN to BSN program and start on the path to earning your degree!

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In today’s world of higher education, registered nurses everywhere are faced with countless options of where to further their education. Grand Canyon University understands that these students often have full-time jobs, families and commitments to factor in when exploring their higher education options. This is why the College of Nursing and Health Care Professions is proud to promote our online RN to BSN for registered nurses looking to become part of the 80% of nurses who have their BSN by 2020.  

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Grand Canyon University’s online RN to BSN program is offered by the College of Nursing and Health Care Professions and designed to provide registered nurses with a way to earn their bachelor’s degree in a convenient format. The curriculum of GCU’s RN to BSN program is in alignment with American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) standards, and the program is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE). If you’re unsure whether now is the right time to pursue your BSN, then consider these questions:

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