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The College of Nursing and Health Care Professions is comprised of diverse health care disciplines, including nursing, health care administration, athletic training, public health and health care informatics. We are united by the common goal of training the next generation of health care professionals and leaders to effectively address health care challenges. The content of this blog includes perspectives on current health care topics, discussion about health care trends, a showcase of successful alumni and faculty and posts about our passion for our respective fields.
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Category: Featured
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By Melinda Martell
Guest Blogger, College of Nursing and Health Care Professions

The ultimate challenge becoming gluten-free is eating outside the home. Whether at families, friends’ houses or restaurants, cross-contamination is every Celiac’s worst nightmare. It only takes a crumb of gluten to affect a Celiac. Cross-contamination is a real threat that can happen when using shared toasters, colanders and cutting boards. Even the bulk food bins at stores can be contaminated. Sharing mayonnaise, peanut butter, jelly, butter, etc. is also a potential source of cross-contamination. A tip is to buy these items in a squeezable form.

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By Danielle Henderson, MPH, CHES
Faculty, College of Nursing and Health Care Professions

Experts recommend adults sleep seven-to-nine hours a night (Olson, 2016). However, according to the CDC, more than 33 percent of American adults do not meet this criterion (Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 2016). On average, how much sleep do you get each night? Is technology getting in the way of your sleep? How many of the following can you answer yes to?

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By Cathy Smyser MSN, FNP-C
Faculty, College of Nursing and Health Care Professions

While the American Heart Association has marked November as “Eat Smart Month,” we should all consider eating smarter every day of every month. Our good health depends on it!

So what constitutes “smart eating?” A simple web search will result in multitudes of hits with literally hundreds of sites and dozens of books to choose from.  A whole-foods, plant-based diet is one that is getting lots of attention and for a good reason. There is no specific definition of this as a diet, but it is better to consider it a lifestyle. The basic principles of this eating strategy may include:

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By Melinda Martell
Guest Blogger, College of Nursing and Health Care Professions

Celiac disease has a broad spectrum of symptoms and each case varies, for instance, my son was constipated while others with Celiac disease can have diarrhea. Countless Celiac’s are misdiagnosed with other issues such as irritable bowel syndrome or chronic constipation. Celiac disease can also trick the body into thinking it is lactose intolerant due to the damage to the villi caused by eating gluten. The varying symptoms are why it can be difficult to diagnose Celiac disease correctly.

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By Rob Gaunt, MSN, FNP-C
Faculty, College of Nursing and Health Care Professions

Alzheimer’s, the most common form of dementia, affects nearly five million people over the age of 60 in the United States. That number doubles after the age of 65. It has become the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. This amounts to one in three seniors or death from Alzheimer’s every 65 seconds.

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By Sarah Schroyer, MSN, RN, CHPN, NE-BC, CNE
Faculty, College of Nursing and Health Care Professions

I was excited to visit my aunt and uncle for their anniversary. It had been almost two months since my husband and I had been to see them and almost the whole family would be there. I ignored the fatigued feeling I had, as I knew I had stayed up late after working a long week. I opted not to walk the dogs with my husband; I was just a bit sore for some reason—probably slept funny.

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By Gwen Wodiuk, DNP, FNP-C
Faculty, College of Nursing and Health Care Professions

 

Most people understand what a nurse is. Usually, they picture someone taking care of sick people. Frequently this care takes place in a hospital. There are several pathways nurses can pursue after the initial stage of caring for people who are hospitalized. There are four types of nurses who are considered “advanced practice.” These nurses work as nurse practitioners, nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, and clinical nurse specialists.

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