About
The College of Nursing and Health Care Professions is comprised of diverse health care disciplines, including nursing, health care administration, athletic training, public health and health care informatics. We are united by the common goal of training the next generation of health care professionals and leaders to effectively address health care challenges. The content of this blog includes perspectives on current health care topics, discussion about health care trends, a showcase of successful alumni and faculty and posts about our passion for our respective fields.
Let's get started on your degree

* Do you have a high school, college or university credits from outside the U.S.?
* Are you a U.S. Citizen?
* Are you a licensed, registered nurse in the U.S.?
(example: 777-777-7777)
Browse

* Required field

** Required field if international

Request More Information
Category: Featured
0

By Dulce Maria Ruelas
Faculty, College of Nursing and Health Care Professions

Smoking is no longer an individual economic burden but a population health complexity because of the ramifications of secondhand smoke, thirdhand smoke, environmental conditions, healthcare utilization, mortality rates, disability and quality of life. Tobacco control was initiated with the 1964 surgeon general’s report of the effects of smoking on public health (Levy, Meza, Zhang, & Holford, 2016).

Continue Reading
0

By Dulce Ruelas
Faculty, College of Nursing and Health Care Professions

Public health is about health promotion and education. However, sometimes prevention discussion is needed to stop the exacerbation of a chronic condition or creation of co-morbidities. The conversation that surrounds diabetes is a combination of these terms.  Being a college student with diabetes can be cumbersome but manageable. Whether you are living on campus or commuting to classes, note that juggling diabetes and college life is possible.

Continue Reading
0

Tobacco use remains the leading cause of preventable death and illness around the world. According to the American Cancer Society, one in five deaths in the United States are caused by cigarette smoking. Quitting smoking is not easy and it does not happen overnight. However, there are many benefits to quitting. Two weeks to three months after quitting, your circulation improves and your lung function increases. After one year of being smoke-free, your heart attack risk drops dramatically. Ten years after quitting smoking, your risk of dying from lung cancer is about half that of a person who still smokes.

Continue Reading
0

By Veronica Perez, MPH, CHES
Assistant Professor, College of Nursing & Health Care Professions

The dangers of tobacco and cigarette smoking are well-documented. According to the National Cancer Institute, there is no safe tobacco product because all forms of tobacco are addictive and harmful to health. In recent years, electronic cigarettes, or e-cigarettes, have become popular with teens and young adults. E-cigarettes (also called “vapes” or “vape pens”) are devices containing nicotine and flavorings that heat liquid into an aerosol which is then inhaled by the user. Use of e-cigarettes is commonly called “vaping.” As conventional cigarette smoking rates decline, vaping rates are on a steady climb among youth and adults. These devices are viewed by many as safer than cigarette smoking…but is vaping a safer alternative to smoking?

Continue Reading
0

ER nurses deal with an incredible variety of cases every shift, and not every medical problem causes visible signs. There is an increasing trend toward behavioral health patients seeking emergency room care, simply because they have nowhere else to turn or because their family members brought them to the ER when the mental disorder became unmanageable. Behavioral health patients can present an array of challenges, which may include delusions, aggression and suicide ideation. Every emergency care nurse should know how to handle behavioral health patients. You can gain the knowledge and skills you need via an RN to BSN degree program and continuing education courses.

Continue Reading
0

Any job has the potential to involve stress and interpersonal conflict, but it doesn’t have to be this way. When the workplace is a hospital and those who are ill and injured are relying on the health care providers, it’s essential for those providers to work well together as a cooperative team. A strong nursing team is also integral to high job satisfaction, retention rates and overall quality of life for the employees.

Continue Reading
0

Registered nurses provide a shoulder for grieving family members to lean on. They hold their patients’ hands and offer emotional support during some of the most difficult times in life. Nursing isn’t for the faint of heart—it’s a ministry to others and it can be emotionally draining. RNs can find solace in their faith communities, but it’s also essential for them to develop their own emotional resiliency.

Continue Reading
0

By Dulce Ruelas, MPH, CHES, CBC
Instructor, Master of Public Health Program

Mass Contagion

Have you thought about how social media can influence our daily lives constantly? Do you know the concept of mass contagion? Mass contagion is the phenomenon where society takes it upon themselves to spread information without knowing its validity. This, as you know, can easily alarm society because of the various social methods technology has to offer (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, etc.). As you read this, are you reflecting on what social media you use? How many times do you check your phone for new feeds? What types of news do you like or relate to? Simply stated, how do you communicate with others if it is not done by actually dialing their phone number?

Continue Reading
Next Page »

In case you missed it: