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The College of Nursing and Health Care Professions is comprised of diverse health care disciplines, including nursing, health care administration, athletic training, public health and health care informatics. We are united by the common goal of training the next generation of health care professionals and leaders to effectively address health care challenges. The content of this blog includes perspectives on current health care topics, discussion about health care trends, a showcase of successful alumni and faculty and posts about our passion for our respective fields.
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4 Networking Tips for Nursing Professionals

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Nurses who network successfully often find it easier to advance in their career. They also have a strong support system to lean on, as only another nurse can truly understand the common challenges faced by nursing professionals. Networking isn’t difficult, but it does require a little effort. Here are a few networking tips for nursing professionals to help you start building relationships:

Get to Know Your Fellow Nursing Students

If you are advancing your education through an RN to BSN program or earning your Master of Science in Nursing, you have the perfect opportunity to network with your fellow students. Invite some of them to join you for coffee after class or see if anyone is interested in forming a study group. Make yourself approachable and friendly, and you’ll be rewarded with long-lasting professional relationships. If you’ve already graduated, join the alumni network. Check for local alumni events, connect with your local chapter and keep your information updated at the Office of Alumni Relations.

Join Professional Nursing Organizations  

Joining a professional nursing organization should be a top priority. Join your state organization and any available local chapters, and attend meetings and conferences regularly. With all of the digital tools available today, it’s tempting to dismiss the value of face time in favor of less time-consuming, more convenient online opportunities. But nothing can make a connection in quite the same way as an in-person conversation. When you attend events, bring a stack of business cards that include your professional email address.

Use Social Media Platforms Wisely

Social media platforms intended for professionals, such as LinkedIn, are useful for getting your name out there and fostering connections. Take the time to update your information whenever it changes and consider posting some blogs with tips for other nursing professionals or for patients. If you use other social media platforms for your personal life, use the privacy settings and avoid posting anything that a future employer might find objectionable.

Be as Generous as Possible with Your Time

Bring the true spirit of fellowship to your professional network by being generous with your time. Offer to help others when they need it, and they’ll be there for you later down the road. Remind yourself the value of giving freely, whether or not you receive aid in return. As a practical example, consider volunteering for a position with a local nursing organization. By being generous with your time in this way, you might work your way up to a nursing liaison position. In any position you choose to accept, you’ll have lots of opportunities to grow your professional network and contribute to advancements in the nursing field.

Nursing professionals who want to advance their career and their professional network can enroll in one of the online nursing programs at Grand Canyon University. Click on the Request More Information button on this page to learn more.