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Join us on Teaching in Purple to find your purpose and passion in the field of education. Discover inspirational stories from future teachers, faculty, staff and alumni from Grand Canyon University. Peek inside the classrooms of today to shape your classroom of tomorrow. You will look great in purple!
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By Kennedy Lane
Professional Writing Major, College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Nurturing the minds of today’s youth and teaching young children what they need to know to become successful in life can be so rewarding. As a teacher of young children, you have the opportunity to exercise your creativity in nurturing their skills and abilities so that they can navigate their worlds effectively.

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By Dr. Stephanie Knight
Adjunct Faculty, College of Education

Our brain is an image processor, not a word processor (Kouyoumdjian, 2012). Moreover, if our students have been raised in this media-centered society, the pedagogical use of visual aids to engage them is a must.

There are different ways to enrich a lesson using visual aids. If we want retention of information, these six ways are sure to do the trick. The acronym V.I.S.U.A.L. will help you remember these six ideas.

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By Dr. Stephanie Knight
Adjunct Faculty, College of Education

Today, I observed a classroom filled with twenty undergraduate college students. I could count on one hand the number of times they looked up at the instructor in a forty-five-minute time period. The instructor was gentle, kind and caring; he also was filled with content knowledge. Of course, this is vital when teaching children or adults. But according to Marzano and Pickering (2011) in their book, The Highly Engaged Classroom, not only do students want to feel safe and cared for, they also want the material to be interesting. There is a plethora of ways we could go about accomplishing this objective. However, there is one surefire thing you can do in your classroom which will keep students not only interested, but connected and engaged.

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By Katy Sell, M. Ed
Full-time Faculty, College of Education

Holiday break is over already? Time to head back to my classroom. It is a brand new calendar year and as I sit here in my office, I’m feeling nostalgic about the last group of second graders I taught before becoming a faculty member here at GCU. I remember feeling refreshed and ready to see my students. I missed them over the break and couldn’t wait to hear all about their celebrated time away.

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By Dr. Brandon Juarez
Assistant Professor, College of Education

With Emily Fox and Lindsey Relerford
Students, College of Education; 2018-2019 KDP student officers

Fear is a powerful influence that often consumes teachers. For instance, fear of students, fear of not fully comprehending course content, fear of students’ parents and the fear of looking foolish in the presence of students can all effect the way teachers plan for instruction and ultimately lead students. The associate counselor and the student officers of the local Kappa Delta Pi chapter at GCU are currently reading “The Courage to Teach” by Parker Palmer. The author points to this incapacitating fear as being harmful to teachers. The illumination of this fear, facilitated by the author’s heed to be aware of the damaging effects, sparked a healthy conversation within our group. Ultimately, two critical dispositions regarding acknowledging the presence of fear and how to begin tackling the negative influence of fear emerged from the discussion.

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