About
Join us on Teaching in Purple to find your purpose and passion in the field of education. Discover inspirational stories from future teachers, faculty, staff and alumni from Grand Canyon University. Peek inside the classrooms of today to shape your classroom of tomorrow. You will look great in purple!
Let's get started on your degree

* Do you have a high school, college or university credits from outside the U.S.?
* Are you a U.S. Citizen?
* Are you a licensed, registered nurse in the U.S.?
(example: 777-777-7777)
Browse

* Required field

** Required field if international

Request More Information
Category: Teaching and Instruction
0

By Ashley Olander
Secondary Education Major, College of Education

I’m majoring in secondary education with an emphasis in physical education and am currently in my last semester of my senior year. I am completing my student teaching at Kodaikanal International School in India. I wanted to do my student teaching abroad because I knew that it would give me an opportunity to learn about a different culture and see how an educational setting outside of the U.S. differs from ours. So when the opportunity to teach at this school came along, I knew that I could not pass it up! I am helping teach seventh grade physical and health education.

Continue Reading
0

By Meredith Critchfield, PhD
Associate Professor, College of Education

It all started over some gluten-free pasta. Last fall, I was stirring a boiling pot of pasta at my stove, glancing at my daughter in her play room. I started thinking about podcasting. I love listening to podcasts and think audio media in general is the new wave of communication. More and more people every day turn to podcasts to receive information rather than traditional news channels.

It occurred to me as I whirled the pasta around, “Why don’t we start a podcast for the College of Education?” I immediately texted College of Education Faculty Chair Emily Pottinger. Emily and I find joy in coming up with “out of the box” ideas, so I figured she’d grab on to the idea right away. I was right. Within seconds, she replied, “Yes! That’s perfect! Let’s do it!”

Continue Reading
0

History can be one of the most exciting subject areas for middle and high school students, but many of them can have trouble connecting to the material. Among this demographic, history may have an undeserved reputation for being stuffy and irrelevant. As an aspiring history teacher, you may be wondering how you can encourage your future students to love historical topics as much as you do. It’s time to reimagine the way in which history is taught. Here are a few ideas to consider for your future teaching career:

Continue Reading
0

If you have been in education, even for a short time, you know that growth mindset is something that educators consider when working with students. About 30 years ago, researcher Carol Dweck became interested in how students talked about failure. She discovered that some students were able to bounce back quickly after failure, while others got stuck, feeling like setbacks were very difficult to get over. The students who could rebound quickly from failure have what Dweck coined a “growth mindset,” while students who struggle after failure have a “fixed mindset.” Students with growth mindsets believe that they can get better if they continue to learn and practice. Students with fixed mindsets believe that ability is an inherent trait and that they may just never be good at something.

Continue Reading
0

One of the best ways to ensure student success is to make sure teachers receive highly effective professional development. Like other professions, teachers are required to participate in continuing education in order to improve their practices and stay licensed. Besides university classes, teachers attend trainings given by their schools and districts. These trainings are usually on a range of important topics that support the improvement plans and goals of the larger organization.

Continue Reading
0

By Dr. Stephanie Knight
Faculty, College of Education

Lately, I’ve had a glaring wake up call. My 5-year-old has shown me the many words I use which I take for granted. Just the other day my mom and I were discussing a political candidate and how he waffles on the issues. My daughter’s ears perked up because she heard the word “waffles.” Our students and especially our English Language Learners are not much different in that they don’t have the prior knowledge to know the meaning or context of many words. If we want to cement learning and make it meaningful, we must understand the importance of building and/or activating background knowledge. This means not only in vocabulary (including academic language) but in the content we teach.

Continue Reading
0

Dance is a beautiful medium for expression. It’s artistic and graceful, yet requires strength and coordination. It’s a fluid string of fleeting movements, yet requires enduring commitment to long hours of repetitious practice. As an aspiring dance instructor, you can share the beauty and joy of dancing with classes of eager students. But, even the most dedicated of students can get a little fidgety at times. Here’s a look at how you might manage your future students.

Continue Reading
0

Special education teachers are specially trained and licensed teachers who work with students with special needs. Special educators, in some cases, carry a class roster; however, because of programs like mainstreaming and RTI, special education classes are becoming rarer. Instead, today’s special educators work closely with general education teachers to provide support to students in the classroom.

Continue Reading
0

By Dr. Stephanie Knight
Faculty, College of Education

Are you often asked how you will spend your summer? You might respond, Oh, I’m definitely going to rest. I will challenge you to have a fresh lens about rest. Rest is not about just relaxing; it’s about restoration. Restoration is active. In fact, the dictionary describes it as “the act of bringing back something that existed before.” What if you could return to that excitement you had going into your first year?

Continue Reading
Next Page »

In case you missed it: