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Category: Featured
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By Ashley Olander
Secondary Education Major, College of Education

I’m majoring in secondary education with an emphasis in physical education and am currently in my last semester of my senior year. I am completing my student teaching at Kodaikanal International School in India. I wanted to do my student teaching abroad because I knew that it would give me an opportunity to learn about a different culture and see how an educational setting outside of the U.S. differs from ours. So when the opportunity to teach at this school came along, I knew that I could not pass it up! I am helping teach seventh grade physical and health education.

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By Tawn Altunova
Student, College of Education

When I think about culturally inclusive teaching, I am reminded about my experiences in elementary school. My teachers really made an effort to know the students, the faculty and staff as well as the community members. They also seemed to be very proficient in what they taught. I remember that I was very engaged and involved in what I was learning because the teachers made the lessons applicable to the ideas and cultural values of the community. The population at my elementary school was quite diverse, and many of my friends spoke a language other than English at home. This did not deter my teachers from establishing authentic relationships with all of the students and their families.

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By Micah Lee
Alumna, College of Education

Legendary is defined as “remarkable enough to be famous; very well known.” I would venture out to say that many individuals have the goal of being legendary in their lifetime or desire to leave a legacy behind. Being legendary can look very different in different occupations. For example, being legendary for a doctor may mean finding that cure or vaccine, or for a detective it could mean solving the case that has been stumping all others. What does legendary look like for a teacher or an educator?

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By Micah Lee
Alumna, College of Education

Homework is something that was once a nightly staple in the average child’s school life, but as ideas change and the world of education progresses, the concept of homework is under the microscope more than ever before, especially at the primary and elementary level.

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By Brandon Juarez, Natalie Anderson and Claire Kelly

Shepherding new teaching professionals or teacher candidates begins with caring for students. Naturally we all began our careers as novice teachers eager to make a difference! The sincere hope found in this flame has not withered or burned out. In fact, one of the best ways to keep the flame burning strong is to guide a new teacher (or soon to be a new teacher) through the entry-level stages of the career. Remember, we were all there once! Moreover, the support and help you provide goes a long way to help prevent mistakes you made when you were in his or her position. The true winners of your support are his or her students.

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By Emily Pottinger
Assistant Professor, College of Education

Education always seems to be a hot topic of conversation. For teachers this is not just a job, but a way of life. It is a calling. Sometimes, it is beneficial to be reminded of why teachers choose to teach. Not only is knowing the “why” important for the students, but it is important for teachers and their practice. Knowing why we do something helps us understand ourselves, can help drive and motivate us and can help us cut out some not-so-healthy practices, habits or clutter in our lives. This got me thinking. Why do my fellow teachers teach? Do they know their “why”? What better way to find out than to ask?

A few colleagues and I had an opportunity to survey some fellow teachers about the reason why they teach. What started like any other survey ended up becoming quite a powerful learning experience. The results were so moving that I was inspired to compile them into a list of the top reasons why teachers do what they do. Read our top ten reasons, share with your fellow teachers and never forget WHY you teach!

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By M.J. Tykoski, M.Ed.
Alumna, College of Education

Step aside Halloween and Columbus Day! There’s another great holiday in October, one that is near and dear to chemistry enthusiasts: National Mole Day! This doesn’t refer to the little burrowing animal that tears up people’s yards. Instead, it is a crucial quantity that forms the basis for many measurements in chemistry. For those who haven’t taken a chemistry class in a while, let’s review!

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By Meredith Critchfield, PhD
Associate Professor, College of Education

It all started over some gluten-free pasta. Last fall, I was stirring a boiling pot of pasta at my stove, glancing at my daughter in her play room. I started thinking about podcasting. I love listening to podcasts and think audio media in general is the new wave of communication. More and more people every day turn to podcasts to receive information rather than traditional news channels.

It occurred to me as I whirled the pasta around, “Why don’t we start a podcast for the College of Education?” I immediately texted College of Education Faculty Chair Emily Pottinger. Emily and I find joy in coming up with “out of the box” ideas, so I figured she’d grab on to the idea right away. I was right. Within seconds, she replied, “Yes! That’s perfect! Let’s do it!”

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