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Category: Education Today
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By Kennedy Lane Professional Writing Major, College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Getting the opportunity to teach children today is so meaningful because you are not only giving them the tools they need to become successful in life but also to become the next great generation to make an impact on the world. Teaching in a Christian school allows you to live out your Christian faith as well as teach young students what being a Christian means. Here are some reasons why working in a Christian school is a perfect fit when you are a Christian.

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Creative thinking is a skill that many educators have identified as important for students’ future college and career success. That is because creativity informs problem solving and innovation. When a person can think about problems in new ways or from a different perspective, they can imagine a whole world of possible solutions. These innovations have the potential to impact lots of people.

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By Kate Sitzmann
Bachelors of Science in Elementary and Special Education, College of Education

In today’s classrooms, we see a complete spectrum of students ranging in interests and abilities. As educators, we must be prepared for students who already know what we are teaching, are right on target or are still grasping at earlier concepts. In addition, we have students with Individualized Education Plans (IEP) and 504 plans that need more scaffolding instruction and support. I found that juggling schedules with curriculum and intervention groups was quite the circus act. Teaching is such a performance. You must captivate your audience, relate material and then leave your students wanting more to encourage their own discoveries.

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By Kennedy Lane
Professional Writing Major, College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Nurturing the minds of today’s youth and teaching young children what they need to know to become successful in life can be so rewarding. As a teacher of young children, you have the opportunity to exercise your creativity in nurturing their skills and abilities so that they can navigate their worlds effectively.

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By Dr. Stephanie Knight
Adjunct Faculty, College of Education

Our brain is an image processor, not a word processor (Kouyoumdjian, 2012). Moreover, if our students have been raised in this media-centered society, the pedagogical use of visual aids to engage them is a must.

There are different ways to enrich a lesson using visual aids. If we want retention of information, these six ways are sure to do the trick. The acronym V.I.S.U.A.L. will help you remember these six ideas.

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By Katy Sell, M. Ed
Full-time Faculty, College of Education

Holiday break is over already? Time to head back to my classroom. It is a brand new calendar year and as I sit here in my office, I’m feeling nostalgic about the last group of second graders I taught before becoming a faculty member here at GCU. I remember feeling refreshed and ready to see my students. I missed them over the break and couldn’t wait to hear all about their celebrated time away.

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By Dr. Brandon Juarez
Assistant Professor, College of Education

With Emily Fox and Lindsey Relerford
Students, College of Education; 2018-2019 KDP student officers

Fear is a powerful influence that often consumes teachers. For instance, fear of students, fear of not fully comprehending course content, fear of students’ parents and the fear of looking foolish in the presence of students can all effect the way teachers plan for instruction and ultimately lead students. The associate counselor and the student officers of the local Kappa Delta Pi chapter at GCU are currently reading “The Courage to Teach” by Parker Palmer. The author points to this incapacitating fear as being harmful to teachers. The illumination of this fear, facilitated by the author’s heed to be aware of the damaging effects, sparked a healthy conversation within our group. Ultimately, two critical dispositions regarding acknowledging the presence of fear and how to begin tackling the negative influence of fear emerged from the discussion.

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By Tawn Altunova
Student, College of Education

When I think about culturally inclusive teaching, I am reminded about my experiences in elementary school. My teachers really made an effort to know the students, the faculty and staff as well as the community members. They also seemed to be very proficient in what they taught. I remember that I was very engaged and involved in what I was learning because the teachers made the lessons applicable to the ideas and cultural values of the community. The population at my elementary school was quite diverse, and many of my friends spoke a language other than English at home. This did not deter my teachers from establishing authentic relationships with all of the students and their families.

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By Micah Lee
Alumna, College of Education

Legendary is defined as “remarkable enough to be famous; very well known.” I would venture out to say that many individuals have the goal of being legendary in their lifetime or desire to leave a legacy behind. Being legendary can look very different in different occupations. For example, being legendary for a doctor may mean finding that cure or vaccine, or for a detective it could mean solving the case that has been stumping all others. What does legendary look like for a teacher or an educator?

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By Micah Lee
Alumna, College of Education

Homework is something that was once a nightly staple in the average child’s school life, but as ideas change and the world of education progresses, the concept of homework is under the microscope more than ever before, especially at the primary and elementary level.

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