About
Join us on Teaching in Purple to find your purpose and passion in the field of education. Discover inspirational stories from future teachers, faculty, staff and alumni from Grand Canyon University. Peek inside the classrooms of today to shape your classroom of tomorrow. You will look great in purple!
Let's get started on your degree

* Do you have a high school, college or university credits from outside the U.S.?
* Are you a U.S. Citizen?
* Are you a licensed, registered nurse in the U.S.?
(example: 777-777-7777)
Browse

* Required field

** Required field if international

Request More Information
Category: Education Today
0

By Abbie Carnes
Elementary Education Major, College of Education

By Meredith Critchfield, PhD
Faculty, College of Education

Rosalind Franklin, Jocelyn Bell Burnell, Esther Lenderberg, Chien- Shiung Wu, Lise Meitner, Nettie Stevens; these all are names of female scientists who were not recognized for their outstanding discoveries. Tensions still run high with women working in the STEM field today.

Continue Reading
0

By Stephanie Knight, PhD
Adjunct Faculty, College of Education

“From the quiet reflection will come even more effective action.” Peter Drucker, famous management consultant, educator and author, found that increased time for thinking or reflection led to better results no matter the endeavor.

Continue Reading
0

By Patrick Zuniga
Alumnus, College of Education 

In March 1968, two events occurred that emphasized the need for equality in education to disrupt the cycle of poverty and create social mobility for all students: first, The East Los Angeles Blowouts which called for equality for Latinos in East LA high schools; second, Martin Luther King’s speech “The Other America,” where poverty and miseducation were linked.

Continue Reading
0

By Candace M. Robick, PhD
Site Supervisor, College of Education

Is inclusion the appropriate practice for all schools? This is definitely a good question and one that needs to be addressed. As an educator, I believe that including all students in the curriculum and offering the appropriate modifications and accommodations for them to best navigate through the course is the best choice. Some parents and educators may wonder about the benefits of inclusion, and I would have to point them in the direction of advocating for and doing what is best for the child.

Continue Reading
0

By Valeriana Bandeh
MA in TESOL Student, College of Education 

I watched, as he stood towering over the students. He began to tell his story of how he became a landscape engineer earning over $300,000 a year. How was that possible? That was much more than I had ever earned. He was my student and I remembered how unkempt he looked. He was tardy, struggled academically in class, did no homework and was extremely rebellious. He refused to follow the school’s strict uniform policy. But as I listened, he told his story—of unimaginable poverty and how he overcame.

Continue Reading
0

By Stephanie Knight
Adjunct Faculty, College of Education

When I was getting my master’s degree in education, my mom gave me sagacious advice: “Don’t put a box around a child; all kids are smart in some way.” Being in education for 35 years, part of her tenure was teaching art. Working with the students in art class, she saw something others did not. Her colleagues would tell her that a particular student was failing math or reading. Disregarding any preconceived notions about any one student, she allowed for multiple ways of expression.  Those labeled as the “problem students” thrived in her class.

Continue Reading
0

If students only learned the information that they hear in lectures or read in books, then Thomas Edison would not have created the incandescent light bulb and Edward Jenner would not have developed the first successful vaccine. While it is still important for students to learn what is already known about the world around them, it is arguably even more important for them to uncover new knowledge and possibilities for themselves. This philosophy is the heart of the maker movement.                 

Continue Reading
0

STEM is one of the latest educational buzzwords making the rounds, but it is quickly being elbowed out of the picture by STEAM education. This acronym includes arts education in the mix. Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics is an integrated approach to teaching students through collaborative and creative experiential learning activities.

Continue Reading
0

No matter how thoroughly your degree program prepares you to become a teacher, you will find that there is nothing quite like the insight you will gain from hands-on experience. Many new teachers discover that talking to parents is harder than they expected. The trick is to assume the right mindset. Always remember that the parents know their child best, even though you work with that child every school day. Parents want the best for their kids, but they do not always know how to help them. Everyone will benefit when you start a friendly, collaborative relationship with all of your students’ parents right from the start.

Continue Reading
Next Page »

In case you missed it: