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Join us on Teaching in Purple to find your purpose and passion in the field of education. Discover inspirational stories from future teachers, faculty, staff and alumni from Grand Canyon University. Peek inside the classrooms of today to shape your classroom of tomorrow. You will look great in purple!
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By Kennedy Lane
Professional Writing Major, College of Humanities and Social Sciences

If you want to teach like a pro, it is important to get organized and to get into habits to ensure that you are an effective and successful professional. Here are some habits that you should cultivate.

Have a Weekly Schedule

Keeping a calendar with your schedule will help remind you of everything that you need to do. It will help to be able to physically see what you have to do to help you keep on track with everything to make sure everything gets done. Having everything laid out in front of you will help your days go smoothly. Creating a schedule at either the end or beginning of each week will help you stay on track.

Prepare For the Next Day Before Leaving School

Make your lesson plans and prepare everything that you need for the next school day before you leave school. Make sure your classroom is tidy and everything is organized before you leave for the day. You will feel more organized and prepared for the day ahead when you walk into your classroom in the morning if you do this.

Use Family and Community Volunteers

Make sure that you utilize all of the help that you can get. As humans we often think that our problems are ours to handle and as a teacher you may feel like you need to handle your classroom and your students all on your own. If families and community members volunteer to help, let them, give them projects to help you with or chaperone or anything else you can use them for. They would be happy to help.

Be a Continual Learner

Participate in professional development opportunities that are provided by your school, district, professional associations as well as your university. Not only will these sessions ensure that you stay current in the field, but there are also opportunities for you to advocate for your students as well as your profession.

Don’t Be Afraid to Ask For Help

If there is anything that you are struggling with in your classroom, do not be afraid to ask for help every once in a while. You do not have to take everything on, on your own. Ask other teachers, families or any of the school administration for help when you need it. Other teachers would be willing to help and appreciate when you are able to return the favor and it gives you the opportunity to build your relationship with the other teachers you are working with.

Avoid Negativity

Stay positive in every situation. We all have bad days and good days. It is easy to get ourselves down when we have our bad days and have a negative attitude when things go wrong. If you stay positive and look at the best in every situation, your bad days will be a little easier.

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By Kennedy Lane
Professional Writing Major, College of Humanities and Social Sciences

This Bachelor of Science (BS) in Elementary Education with an Emphasis in Christian Education degree program at GCU will help you learn how to be an elementary teacher from a faith-based perspective. You will develop the skills needed to guide children through an academic journey with a biblical perspective. You will study child and adolescent development in both theory and practice through class and field learning experiences.

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By Diana Anderson
Alum, College of Education

I am often surprised how God uniquely prepares us for the activities He has planned for us. I entered teaching later in life, as a way to pay for my sons’ college educations. With a BS in Interior Design I was able to get a Christian school teaching certificate, but not a state license. I felt competent in my teaching abilities but decided to get a master’s in education to check off the boxes of the state requirements. My GCU program included courses in ESL which were of limited interest to me, initially. Little did I know that those classes would open a whole new ministry opportunity for me.

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By Kennedy Lane
Professional Writing Major, College of Humanities and Social Sciences

The steps to take in becoming a teacher can take a lot of work, but in the end is so rewarding. Choosing to work in early childhood education and early childhood special education is a little different than other early education. Here is what the program looks like and career options with earning the dual degree.

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By Kennedy Lane Professional Writing Major, College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Getting the opportunity to teach children today is so meaningful because you are not only giving them the tools they need to become successful in life but also to become the next great generation to make an impact on the world. Teaching in a Christian school allows you to live out your Christian faith as well as teach young students what being a Christian means. Here are some reasons why working in a Christian school is a perfect fit when you are a Christian.

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Creative thinking is a skill that many educators have identified as important for students’ future college and career success. That is because creativity informs problem solving and innovation. When a person can think about problems in new ways or from a different perspective, they can imagine a whole world of possible solutions. These innovations have the potential to impact lots of people.

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By Kate Sitzmann
Bachelors of Science in Elementary and Special Education, College of Education

In today’s classrooms, we see a complete spectrum of students ranging in interests and abilities. As educators, we must be prepared for students who already know what we are teaching, are right on target or are still grasping at earlier concepts. In addition, we have students with Individualized Education Plans (IEP) and 504 plans that need more scaffolding instruction and support. I found that juggling schedules with curriculum and intervention groups was quite the circus act. Teaching is such a performance. You must captivate your audience, relate material and then leave your students wanting more to encourage their own discoveries.

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