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Join us on Teaching in Purple to find your purpose and passion in the field of education. Discover inspirational stories from future teachers, faculty, staff and alumni from Grand Canyon University. Peek inside the classrooms of today to shape your classroom of tomorrow. You will look great in purple!
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No matter how thoroughly your degree program prepares you to become a teacher, you will find that there is nothing quite like the insight you will gain from hands-on experience. Many new teachers discover that talking to parents is harder than they expected. The trick is to assume the right mindset. Always remember that the parents know their child best, even though you work with that child every school day. Parents want the best for their kids, but they do not always know how to help them. Everyone will benefit when you start a friendly, collaborative relationship with all of your students’ parents right from the start.

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By Micah Lee
Alumna, College of Education 

As a kindergarten teacher, I teach students from all walks of life: my students come into my classroom with diverse backgrounds, experiences, families and cultures. These differences often include values. Some children are raised with Christian values, and some are just taught how to be decent human beings, but some may struggle to understand the importance of having values in one’s life.

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Sometimes in the workplace, people go through difficult moments in which emotions can get a little heated. As a new teacher, it is especially important for you to keep calm. You decided to become a teacher because you wanted to help children reach their full potential. Although there can be challenges, you have the ability to turn problems into powerful opportunities for learning and personal growth. Here are a few tips for keeping your cool in the classroom:

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Teachers spend 7.5 hours in the classroom each day, followed by an average of 90 additional minutes for afterschool mentoring and staff meetings, followed by another 95 minutes of grading papers and preparing lesson plans at home. That is according to The Washington Post, which highlights the selfless dedication of hardworking teachers who genuinely try to make a positive difference in students’ lives. But no matter how dedicated you are, there is no question that time management and other strategies can help you stay on top of grading. Here are some suggestions to grade faster:

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Congratulations on your decision to become a teacher! Teaching is a rewarding career, as you will have the opportunity to inspire your students as they transition through dynamic periods of personal growth. To be a successful teacher candidate, you should make good use of the resources of the university, such as the Servant Educators program at Grand Canyon University. Have constructive discussions with your peers, and be receptive to feedback and new ideas. Here are a few more ideas to help you succeed as a teacher candidate:

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By Anastasia Smith
Early Childhood Education Major, College of Education

“There is a fundamental question we all have to face. How are we to live our lives; by what principles and moral values will we be guided and inspired?” (H. Jackson Brown, Jr.)

As educators, we are responsible for the lives of impressionable young people, our students who will spend up to 6.5 educational hours a day with us. Therefore, we have a great responsibility to give them the skillsets they will need to succeed in the world. It is important, however, to remember that this isn’t limited to killer social skills or the ability to navigate the academic world seamlessly; as educators, we also have to model great values.

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By MJ Tykoski, MEd
Alumna, College of Education

One of the acronyms de jour in science education today is STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). It is a nice catch-all for science and the subjects that are closely related to science. However, diving a little deeper into how STEM plays out in classrooms reveals a disturbing trend. Not all sciences are adequately represented; Earth and space sciences are often left out. This means students are not receiving a well-rounded science education, which should be a concern for any dedicated STEM teacher.

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