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Living Faith is a Christian blog that interacts with a variety of biblical, theological and practical topics written by Grand Canyon University's College of Theology faculty and specially invited guests of the college. Our content provides practical and biblical advice from a Christian worldview for living our faith in the midst of an increasingly secularized world. In addition, our content wrestles with cultural topics and issues that challenge how we live out our faith as believers. For this reason, contributors to our Christian blog strive to write with compassion and apologetic concern to honor Christ and edify the church in every way possible.
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Category: Sound Doctrine
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By Jason Hiles, PhD
Dean, College of Theology

In order to model the value of evangelical unity to students, the faculty at Grand Canyon Theological Seminary are careful to make key distinctions in their teaching and classroom interaction.

Theologians and other Christian leaders have long distinguished between doctrine that is absolutely essential to the Christian faith and other teachings that, although important, are not fundamental to Christianity.

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By Pete Charpentier, D.Min.
Faculty, College of Theology

Fostering unity has always been a challenge for Christians. For example, Paul challenged the Church at Corinth to embrace unity and reject factions (1 Corinthians 1:10-13). But this might be expected since the believers at Corinth struggled on many fronts. However, Paul also called apparent leaders in the Church at Philippi, a church which seemed to be healthy, to be unified (Philippians 4:2-3).

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By Joe Stanley
Faculty, College of Theology

The Christian church has believed that Jesus was God for 2,000 years of its history. While the word “Trinity” is not found in the Bible, the Scripture that helped formulate that doctrine is found in the Bible.

Additionally, in response to a major controversy in the church, the Emperor Constantine called a church council in A.D. 325 at Nicaea to solve the controversy that was dividing the church. Some were teaching that Jesus was not fully human, and others were teaching that Jesus was not fully God.

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By Hector Llanes
Faculty, College of Theology

Recent research on the resurrection of Jesus points to the historicity of the events surrounding His resurrection. These results decidedly support the belief that Jesus’ resurrection was a real event in human history.

Lee Strobel, in his book “The Case for the Resurrection: A First-Century Reporter Investigates the Story of the Cross,” shared the results of research done by Dr. Gary Habermas and Dr. Michael Licona, two experts on the resurrection of Jesus.

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By Hector Llanes
Faculty, College of Theology

The recent discovery of part of the Gospel of Judas has sparked a renewed debate concerning the so-called Gnostic Gospels. Many are confused when reading of the existence of a Gospel from Judas; is this an authentic Gospel written by the disciple of Jesus? What about other Gospels, such as the Gospel of Thomas? Can we trust the Gospels in the Bible?

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By Jason Hiles, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Theology

It is difficult to overestimate the significance of Holy Scripture when you consider the theological task and the goals of Christian ministry. Certainly other sources of knowledge are of value as we formulate theology and minister to God’s people.

Often personal experience is brought to bear as we reflect on the needs of the community and the challenges that are facing us. Similarly, the traditions that shape the community of faith are profoundly important as they represent the accumulated wisdom of God’s people. Furthermore, reason enables us to reflect on God’s word in light of our particular circumstances and context.

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By Steve Duby, Ph.D.
Faculty, College of Theology

Recently, Bart Campolo (a high-profile person in evangelical Christianity) announced that he has become an atheist, prompting his father, Tony Campolo (another high-profile evangelical voice) to express his sadness but also declare that God doesn’t send people to hell for bad theology.

This is an intriguing and intensely practical question: does bad theology put people in hell? There is a certain sense in which it does not. Any number of believers around the world may fail to understand the subtleties and finer points of some areas of Christian doctrine.

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By Jason Hiles, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Theology

In the fourth chapter of 2 Timothy, the apostle Paul charges his young protégé, Timothy, to carry out the chief duties of his office as an elder:

“Preach the word; be ready in season and out of season; reprove, rebuke, and exhort, with complete patience and teaching … be sober-minded, endure suffering, do the work of an evangelist, fulfill your ministry” (1 Tim. 4:2-5).

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