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Category: Featured
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By Ben Vilkas
Faculty, College of Education

In an ever increasingly connected society, it is critical for classroom teachers to create an environment that integrates literacy across all disciplines in a culturally inclusive manner. Primarily, this can be done through the use of thematic instruction that is centered on students’ cultural backgrounds. The effective alignment of Arizona state standards to culturally inclusive activities not only promotes active learning and student engagement but also establishes a love of diversity while at the same time, promoting a spirit of unity.

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By Dr. Mary Ann Manos
Faculty, College of Education

Excellent teaching has many levels. In a single classroom moment, competent teachers make decisions on many aspects and levels of learning. They must adequately judge content, student interaction, curriculum, assessment levels, school policy implementation, legal impact and interpersonal skills all in the same decision.

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By Abbie Carnes
Elementary Education Major, College of Education

By Meredith Critchfield, PhD
Faculty, College of Education

Rosalind Franklin, Jocelyn Bell Burnell, Esther Lenderberg, Chien- Shiung Wu, Lise Meitner, Nettie Stevens; these all are names of female scientists who were not recognized for their outstanding discoveries. Tensions still run high with women working in the STEM field today.

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By Stephanie Knight, PhD
Adjunct Faculty, College of Education

“From the quiet reflection will come even more effective action.” Peter Drucker, famous management consultant, educator and author, found that increased time for thinking or reflection led to better results no matter the endeavor.

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By Patrick Zuniga
Alumnus, College of Education 

In March 1968, two events occurred that emphasized the need for equality in education to disrupt the cycle of poverty and create social mobility for all students: first, The East Los Angeles Blowouts which called for equality for Latinos in East LA high schools; second, Martin Luther King’s speech “The Other America,” where poverty and miseducation were linked.

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By Candace M. Robick, PhD
Site Supervisor, College of Education

Is inclusion the appropriate practice for all schools? This is definitely a good question and one that needs to be addressed. As an educator, I believe that including all students in the curriculum and offering the appropriate modifications and accommodations for them to best navigate through the course is the best choice. Some parents and educators may wonder about the benefits of inclusion, and I would have to point them in the direction of advocating for and doing what is best for the child.

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By Amanda Ronan
Contributor

With so many distractions and other outside influences, it sometimes seems like school is the last thing on teenagers’ minds. Secondary teachers understand that their students are dealing with many stressful life events; for some students, it is pressure to measure up in school or in athletics. Other students are worried about what they will do when they finish high school. Still others are dealing with issues like teen pregnancy, homelessness and drug addiction.

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