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Category: Educating Our Children
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By Micah Lee
Alumna, College of Education 

As a kindergarten teacher, I teach students from all walks of life: my students come into my classroom with diverse backgrounds, experiences, families and cultures. These differences often include values. Some children are raised with Christian values, and some are just taught how to be decent human beings, but some may struggle to understand the importance of having values in one’s life.

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By Anastasia Smith
Early Childhood Education Major, College of Education

“There is a fundamental question we all have to face. How are we to live our lives; by what principles and moral values will we be guided and inspired?” (H. Jackson Brown, Jr.)

As educators, we are responsible for the lives of impressionable young people, our students who will spend up to 6.5 educational hours a day with us. Therefore, we have a great responsibility to give them the skillsets they will need to succeed in the world. It is important, however, to remember that this isn’t limited to killer social skills or the ability to navigate the academic world seamlessly; as educators, we also have to model great values.

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By Faith Brown, MA, MEd
Alumna, College of Education

Cultural-centered teaching is an instructional method that requires knowledge of all cultures present in the classroom. Once classroom culture has been identified, the culture of the educator forms a perimeter of protection to the learning environment, making it a safe place for students and the teacher to be culturally influenced while learning.

Race is not a factor in cultural-centered teaching, for we can be of the same race, but of different cultures. Culture of community members acts as the light to brighten the paths to success for students when community members are actively involved in providing internships, employment, job shadowing opportunities and information that is essential to students making informed decisions about their future.

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By Stephanie Knight, EdD
Adjunct Faculty, College of Education

You’ve worked so hard to get where you are in teaching. You’ve conquered the grueling schooling; you’ve weathered the late nights of grading papers; you’ve remedied the lesson that just flopped; and you’ve even dealt with the difficult students and helped them overcome their limitations.

So what’s making coming to work so much harder these days?

Perhaps it’s a parent or two.

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By Corey Krampen, MEd
Alumnus, College of Education

Students who are in need of repeating a grade early in their educational career oftentimes feel like a failure. While that may be true in this particular grade level, it does not mean that the student is a failure forever. How the student’s parents view this and how they convey their feelings to their child can be beneficial or detrimental. The student will feed off of the parents’ vibes.

In a perfect world, of course, none of us want our children to have to repeat a grade. However, if our viewpoint on this focuses on the positives rather than the setback, our children will be more inclined to use this event as a launch pad towards the rest of their career. The same holds true for the parents. If they choose to use this setback as a launching pad, their child will benefit.

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By Brandon Juarez, MEd
Assistant Professor, College of Education

Character education is at the heart of a free and appropriate public education. If this seems commonsense and undisputable, one only has to search local district websites to see vast differences in how schools interpret the meaning, purpose and value of character education. Neighboring districts vary from collaborative initiatives that span from kindergarten through high school, while others make no mention or do not seem to display much effort.

Why is there such a difference?

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By Chantele Serrano Olivo
Early Childhood Education Major, College of Education

Character is defined by a person’s morals. Grand Canyon University’s College of Education defines character by its motto: learning, leading and serving. As students, we learn in the classroom what we want to be. We lead by example, and serve to a greater height and depth.

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By Kellianne Holland
Early Childhood Education Major, College of Education

A classroom is a diverse place where students of different ages, genders, cultures, socio-economic standings and religions all come together to learn. Therefore, it is important for teachers to promote diversity in the classroom. By doing so, students can learn the values of respect, acceptance and community. In addition, teaching tolerance in the classroom will result in students applying their knowledge and education to their homes and communities. Here are four ways to celebrate diversity in your classroom:

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