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Join us on Teaching in Purple to find your purpose and passion in the field of education. Discover inspirational stories from future teachers, faculty, staff and alumni from Grand Canyon University. Peek inside the classrooms of today to shape your classroom of tomorrow. You will look great in purple!
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By Corey Krampen, MEd
Alumnus, College of Education

Students who are in need of repeating a grade early in their educational career oftentimes feel like a failure. While that may be true in this particular grade level, it does not mean that the student is a failure forever. How the student’s parents view this and how they convey their feelings to their child can be beneficial or detrimental. The student will feed off of the parents’ vibes.

In a perfect world, of course, none of us want our children to have to repeat a grade. However, if our viewpoint on this focuses on the positives rather than the setback, our children will be more inclined to use this event as a launch pad towards the rest of their career. The same holds true for the parents. If they choose to use this setback as a launching pad, their child will benefit.

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By Brandon Juarez, MEd
Assistant Professor, College of Education

Character education is at the heart of a free and appropriate public education. If this seems commonsense and undisputable, one only has to search local district websites to see vast differences in how schools interpret the meaning, purpose and value of character education. Neighboring districts vary from collaborative initiatives that span from kindergarten through high school, while others make no mention or do not seem to display much effort.

Why is there such a difference?

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Dr. Kimberly LaPrade is the dean of the College of Education. She earned her PhD in educational leadership from Capella University in 2008 and is a proud Grand Canyon University alumni who received her MEd in secondary education and BA in English/sociology in 2000 and 1990, respectively. Dr. LaPrade’s research efforts focus on topics related to teacher leadership and aspects of teacher preparation, performance and assessment.

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By Stephanie Knight
Adjunct Faculty, College of Education

Let’s face it. Teachers are leaders in their respective classrooms; they hold a high degree of responsibility for themselves and their students. Although it is probably one of the least discussed leadership proficiencies, self-awareness – which falls under the emotional intelligence umbrella – is possibly one of the most valuable.

Developing self-awareness is paramount in the navigation of a teachers’ career and for the students who sit in their classrooms. To develop self-awareness, here are some questions to ask yourself:

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By Kellianne Holland
Early Childhood Education Major, College of Education

Grand Canyon University makes it possible for anyone qualified to become a student, whether you are a recent high school graduate or a working parent. GCU’s education degrees online make it possible for aspiring educators to work towards their goals. Here are a few reasons why GCU is the best place to earn your online education degree:

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By Stephanie Knight, EdD
Adjunct Faculty, College of Education

What other profession besides teaching chisels at the core of one’s being and causes one to feel so deeply, besides perhaps the clergy?

We give so much of ourselves. Burnout lurks ahead unless steps are taken to keep the heart wholly grounded.

There is an inner practice which must take place in the heart of a teacher, and if completed, no matter what endeavor he or she participates in, the ability to handle such demands shall be much more doable. Schools do a great job of professional development and techniques for classroom management, but what about reflective practices for teachers?

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